Administrative Law

Stanton Beeder

Stanton N. Beeder Adjunct Law Professor

Stan is general counsel at Hausmann Construction, Inc.  In that position, he supports the executive team in contract negotiations, handling disputes, advising and administering insurance and surety claims, and provides business advice and representation on a wide range of matters affecting the company, including litigation, arbitration and mediation. 

He was previously partner at Cline, Williams, Wright, Johnson & Oldfather, LLP, where his practice focused on litigation, negotiations, and transactions at the administrative, business, insurance and regulatory levels as well as providing business and personal advice on a variety of matters involving the government. 

Stan graduated from the University of Nebraska in 2001 with a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism and obtained his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Nebraska in 2004, with high distinction, and was Order of the Coif. 

He prides himself on being very engaged in the Lincoln and Omaha communities where he is an adjunct professor at the University of Nebraska College of Law, sits on the Executive Counsel of Lincoln YPG, is the President of the Heartland Big Brothers Big Sisters board of directors, teaches Junior Achievement, is a member of the Lancaster County Indigent Defense Advisory Committee, and is a founding member of 100s of Lincoln Men Who Care.   

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Eric Berger

Eric Berger Earl Dunlap Distinguished Professor of Law

Professor Eric Berger joined the faculty in 2007. He received his B.A. with Honors in History from Brown University, and his J.D. from Columbia Law School, where he was a Kent Scholar and an Articles Editor on the Columbia Law Review. After law school, Professor Berger clerked for the Honorable Merrick B. Garland on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. He then practiced in Jenner & Block's Washington, D.C. office, where he worked on litigation in several state and federal trial and appellate courts, including the United States Supreme Court. Professor Berger's matters there included cases involving lethal injection, same-sex marriage, the detention of foreign nationals at Guantanamo Bay, and internet obscenity.

Professor Berger teaches Constitutional Law I (structure), Constitutional Law II (rights), Constitutional History, Federal Courts, First Amendment, and Statutory Interpretation. He also teaches a class for undergraduates on Legislation and Regulation. He has been voted Professor of the Year by the upperclass law students six times. He has also received the College Distinguished Teaching Award (in 2010), the Law Alumni Council Distinguished Faculty Award (in 2018), and the John H. Binning Award for Excellence (in 2019). 

Professor Berger's scholarship focuses on constitutional law.  Much of his work explores judicial decision making in constitutional cases, with special attention to deference, fact finding, rhetorical strategies, and other under-theorized factors that help shape judicial opinions in constitutional cases.  His article Individual Rights, Judicial Deference, and Administrative Law Norms in Constitutional Decision Making, 91 B.U. L. REV. 2029 (2011), was named the 2011 winner of the American Constitution Society's Richard D. Cudahy Writing Competition on Regulatory and Administrative Law.  Professor Berger has also written extensively about lethal injection litigation.   

Professor Berger has testified in the Nebraska legislature about a variety of constitutional issues, including free speech, lethal injection, and the process for amending the U.S. Constitution.  He is also the faculty advisor to the Law College's chapter of the American Constitution Society and to the Community Legal Education Project, which sends law students into Lincoln public schools to teach about the Constitution.

Professor Berger served as Associate Dean for Faculty from 2016 to 2020.

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Dennis J Burnett Adjunct Professor of Law

Professor Burnett is an attorney and business advisor with experience in commercial transactions and regulatory matters representing both U.S. and foreign clients in the aerospace industry.  He has extensive international experience; particularly in Europe, Russia and China.  Professor Burnett has recognized subject matter expertise in all aspects of commercial space activities, export licensing and compliance and foreign ownership control or influence (“FOCI”) mitigation for U.S. companies holding U.S. facility security clearances.  His experience includes government service, corporate counsel and private practice. 

Some highlights from Professor Burnett’s career include:  representing the Russian Space Agency in the negotiation of the first multi-million dollar Space Station contract with NASA; negotiation of several satellite purchase contracts; drafting the model launch services agreement for an international launch service provider; preparing and obtaining satellite operating licenses for both communications satellites and remote sensing satellites and obtaining national security waivers from the President to allow launches of U.S. satellites or U.S. satellite components from China. 

Professor Burnett actively supports development of space law and policy and export law and policy.  He is a member of the D.C. Bar, American Bar Association, American Association of Aeronautics and Astronautics and is a member and Treasurer of the International Institute of Space Law.  He also served three terms on the Defense Trade Advisory Group for the U.S. Department of State.   Professor Burnett is the Vice Chair of the Advisory Board for the LL.M. Space, Cyber and Telecom Program of the University of Nebraska College of Law.

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Professor Gus Hurwitz

Justin (Gus) Hurwitz Professor of Law, The Menards Director of the Nebraska Governance and Technology Center, and Co-Director of Space, Cyber, and Telecom Law Program

Professor Justin (Gus) Hurwitz work’s builds on his background in law, technology, and economics to consider the interface between law and technology and the role of regulation in high-tech industries. He has a particular expertise in telecommunications law and technology, including data- and cybersecurity, and was recognized as a Cyber Security & Data Privacy Trailblazer by the National Law Journal. His work has appeared in the Brooklyn, Connecticut, DePaul, George Mason, Iowa, Michigan State, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, and other law reviews and journals.

He is the The Menard Director of the Nebraska Governance and Technology Center and the Co-Director of the Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law Program. Since joining the College of Law Faculty, his work has been cited by the FCC, FTC, Federal District and Circuit judges, and United States Senators, and he has spoken or testified before the Senate Commerce Committee, FCC and FTC, the United States Army's 7th Signal Command, and German and Colombian competition regulators.

He is also the Director for Law and Economics Programing with the International Center for Law & Economics (ICLE), a think tank based in Portland, Oregon, where he directs a new law and economics-focused research program and helps to translate academic research into applied policy issues. He also is, or has been, affiliated with the Classical Liberal Institute at New York University School of Law, the National Security Institute at George Mason University, and the American Enterprise Institute.

Professor Hurwitz previously was the inaugural Research Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School’s Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition (CTIC), prior to which he was a Visiting Assistant Professor at George Mason University Law School. From 2007–2010 he was a Trial Attorney with the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division in the Telecommunications and Media Enforcement Section.

Professor Hurwitz has a background in technology having worked at Los Alamos National Lab and interned at the Naval Research Lab prior to law school. During this time his work was recognized by organizations such as the Federal Laboratory Consortium, R&D Magazine, Los Alamos National Lab, IEEE & ACM, and the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California. In addition, he held an Internet2 Land Speed World Record with the Guinness Book of World Records.

Professor Hurwitz received his JD from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was an articles editor on the Chicago Journal of International Law and received Olin and MVP2 law and economics scholarships. He also holds an MA in Economics from George Mason University. He received his BA from St. John’s College.


Watch to learn more about Professor Hurwitz's impact on rural communities.

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Anna Shavers

Anna W. Shavers Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Cline Williams Professor of Citizenship Law

Anna Williams Shavers is the Cline Williams Professor of Citizenship Law and Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion.

Professor Shavers joined the faculty of the University of Nebraska College of Law in 1989. She received her B.S. degree from Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio and her M.S. in Business from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she was elected to membership in the Beta Gamma Sigma Business Honor Society. She received her J.D. degree (cum laude) from the University of Minnesota where she served as Managing Editor of the Minnesota Law Review. She was admitted to the Minnesota Bar in 1979 and the Nebraska bar in 1989. Other positions include: Associate, Faegre & Benson Law Firm, Minneapolis, MN and  Associate Clinical Professor, University of Minnesota.  While at the University of Minnesota, Professor Shavers established that law school's first immigration clinic. Professor Shavers teaches Administrative Law; Immigration Law; Forced Migration (including Human Trafficking); International Gender Issues;  and Gender, Race and Class. She has previously served as Interim Dean and Associate Dean of the College of Law.

Professor Shavers believes that she has found the position for which she is ideally suited. She thoroughly enjoys the interaction with students. She also enjoys having the time to devote to reading and questioning various aspects of our legal system. Her primary interest is the area of immigration and its intersection with gender issues. This area appeals to her because of her appreciation of the differences of people from various cultures.  She is faculty co-advisor to the Multi-Cultural Legal Society and BALSA.

She has served as a Board Member of the Midwestern People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference, Inc., Co-Chair of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking Planning Team. She is a frequent national and international presenter on immigration, human trafficking and administrative law issues.  

She was elected to The American Law Institute  in 2017, appointed to Administrative Conference of the United States in 2016, Elected as Fellow to the Administrative Law Section, American Bar Association(ABA), October 2009 and is a member of the ABA Standing Committee on International Trade in Legal Services.  She has also served as a member of the Vera Institute of Justice and the Lancaster County Attorney's Office - Lancaster County Community Advisory Group for the study of Prosecution and Racial Justice (PRJ); Chair, Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice Section, American Bar Association(ABA) 2014-15;  ABA Immigration Committee, Administrative Law Section Liaison, 2005-2009; Chair (1998-99), Immigration Section, American Association of Law Schools,  Executive Committee member 1999-2000; Chair, Immigration Committee, Administrative Law Section, American Bar Association, 1993- 2006.

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James Tierney

James F. Tierney Assistant Professor of Law

Professor James Tierney joined the faculty in July 2020. His research focuses on stock market regulation, investment management, and corporate finance. Drawing on years of experience advising federal securities regulators in government, and representing financial services firms in private practice, his current projects explore contract design and regulatory enforcement in retail securities markets, where ordinary investors act like consumers. He teaches core and advanced classes in business law.
 
Before joining the faculty, Tierney practiced for five years with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as senior counsel in its Office of the General Counsel. In that role, he advised the Commission on the interpretation of the federal securities laws, and wrote opinions constituting final agency action articulating those interpretations. Before that, he practiced at Mayer Brown LLP in Washington DC, where he represented firms in the financial services and other industries in appellate and class-action litigation, and advised them on regulatory policy. After law school, he clerked for Judge Mary M. Schroeder of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

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