Life as a First Year

Culture

Your first year of law school will admittedly not be easy. You will work hard, you will learn new ways to study, and you will be tested not only on paper, but in your will. We know this, and because of this we cultivate a network of students, organization, and alumni that will help you navigate your first year.

Curriculum

Most law schools across the country have a standard first-year curriculum – which includes Torts, Property, Contracts, Civil Procedure, and Legal Writing. At Nebraska Law, this standard curriculum was expanded to better suit the needs of our students and prepare them for the future. All first-year students take International Perspectives in addition to the standard courses. International Perspectives provides students with an introduction to international law that prepares them to be able to identify and deal with international law issues that they will inevitably encounter as our society becomes increasingly more global. Additionally, we believe it is important for all students to begin thinking about their professional careers from the moment they start law school. Thus, classes in professionalism, career planning, and ethics were added to the first year legal writing course, known as Foundational Legal Skills.

See the First-Year Curriculum

Orientation

The first week you are here we will help you acclimate. Orientation will take you through the ins-and-outs of being a law student; from what to expect on your first day of class to what your family can expect. We want to be sure you are comfortable the first day you sit in your first class.

Faculty

Our faculty members are renowned scholars, many of them recognized as the best in their fields. Professor Burkstrand-Reid is a contributor to the Huffington Post, Professor Sheppard and Professor Bradford recently testified before Congress, and Professor Moberly is a nationally recognized scholar and presenter on the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and whistleblowing. Professor Gardner wrote the book on Criminal Law – literally – and so did Professor Medill for Property. If you take their Property or Criminal Law classes, you learn directly from their nationally recognized casebooks in those areas. When you have a question, who better to ask than the author? These are just representations of all the prestigious accomplishments of the Nebraska Law faculty.