Immigration

Kevin Ruser

Kevin Ruser Richard and Margaret Larson Professor of Law and M.S. Hevelone Professor of Law

Professor Ruser joined the Law College faculty in June, 1985, as a supervising attorney in the Civil Clinical Law Program. He received a B.A. from UNL in 1975, with an English major and a history minor. Professor Ruser attended UNL College of Law and received his J.D. in 1979. He worked for Western Nebraska Legal Services from 1979-1985; the first two years were spent in the Grand Island branch office, and the last four years were spent in the Scottsbluff office, where he was managing attorney. Professor Ruser is the Director of Clinical Programs at the College of Law and teaches in the Civil Clinic and the Immigration Clinic. He also co-administers the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study.  He is a member of the Nebraska State Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the Clinical Section of the Association of American Law Schools, and the Clinical Legal Educators Association. He is currently Co-Chair of the District Court Forms Subcommittee of the Nebraska Supreme Court Self-Represented Litigants Committee, a member of the Nebraska Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Commission, a member of the Nebraska Supreme Court’s Civil Justice Reform Committee, and a member of the Advisory Council of the Office of Public Guardian.

Ruser has worked abroad on law reform and legal education reform projects. In the fall of 2015, he worked with the Iliria University Law faculty in Pristina, Kosovo to help them design an experiential learning course on arbitration. From 2012 to 2015, he was involved in a project in which he evaluated and made recommendations for curricular changes in the Masters Level clinical programs at the University of Pristina Law Faculty and Iliria University Law Faculty in Pristina, Kosovo. From 2000 to 2005, he was involved with law and legal education reform efforts in several countries of the former Yugoslavia, most notably Montenegro and Serbia. From 2010 to 2012, he was, along with Professor Steven Schmidt, principal investigator of a USAID-funded grant to help teach oral advocacy techniques to faculty at the law school of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. These skills are needed by Mexican law students and practitioners to enable them to function effectively in Mexico's new oral adversarial system, which was created by recent constitutional reforms in Mexico.

Ruser's research interests lie primarily in the area of “crimmigration” – the intersection of immigration and criminal law. In August, 2012, he published an article in The Habeas, which is the monthly newsletter of the Nebraska Criminal Defense Attorney’s Association, reviewing and analyzing recent decisions by the Nebraska Supreme Court in the area of post-conviction “crimmigration” cases. Also in 2012, he made substantial updates to The Nebraska Criminal Practitioner’s Guide to Representing Non-Citizens in State Court Proceedings, which he first published in 2008. The Guide's purpose is to background criminal law practitioners in immigration law, in order to enable them to effectively advise their non-citizen clients of possible immigration consequences to criminal proceedings in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 decision in Padilla v. Kentucky holding that non-citizens have a 6th Amendment right to be advised by their defense counsel of immigration consequences in criminal cases. Ruser developed a 4-hour seminar on "crimmigration" issues and presented this seminar in each of Nebraska's 12 district court judicial districts in 2011 and 2012.

In 2011, Greg McLawsen, Julia McLawsen and Ruser co-authored an article entitled Demonstrating Psychological Hardship: A Statistical Study of Psychological Evaluations in Hardship Waivers of Inadmissibility. The article, which was published in the January 1, 2011 issue of Bender's Immigration Bulletin, reviewed decisions of the Administrative Appeals Office (AA0) to see how helpful it is for non-citizens to submit psychological evaluations with their applications for hardship waivers to certain grounds of inadmissibility. Ruser has written other practice-related manuals and guides, the most recent of which are in the following areas: Chapter 7 consumer bankruptcy (2012); powers of attorney, guardianships and conservatorships (2015); and landlord/tenant law (2014).

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Anna Shavers

Anna W. Shavers Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Cline Williams Professor of Citizenship Law

Anna Williams Shavers is the Cline Williams Professor of Citizenship Law and Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion.

Professor Shavers joined the faculty of the University of Nebraska College of Law in 1989. She received her B.S. degree from Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio and her M.S. in Business from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she was elected to membership in the Beta Gamma Sigma Business Honor Society. She received her J.D. degree (cum laude) from the University of Minnesota where she served as Managing Editor of the Minnesota Law Review. She was admitted to the Minnesota Bar in 1979 and the Nebraska bar in 1989. Other positions include: Associate, Faegre & Benson Law Firm, Minneapolis, MN and  Associate Clinical Professor, University of Minnesota.  While at the University of Minnesota, Professor Shavers established that law school's first immigration clinic. Professor Shavers teaches Administrative Law; Immigration Law; Forced Migration (including Human Trafficking); International Gender Issues;  and Gender, Race and Class. She has previously served as Interim Dean and Associate Dean of the College of Law.

Professor Shavers believes that she has found the position for which she is ideally suited. She thoroughly enjoys the interaction with students. She also enjoys having the time to devote to reading and questioning various aspects of our legal system. Her primary interest is the area of immigration and its intersection with gender issues. This area appeals to her because of her appreciation of the differences of people from various cultures.  She is faculty co-advisor to the Multi-Cultural Legal Society and BALSA.

She has served as a Board Member of the Midwestern People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference, Inc., Co-Chair of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Trafficking Planning Team. She is a frequent national and international presenter on immigration, human trafficking and administrative law issues.  

She was elected to The American Law Institute  in 2017, appointed to Administrative Conference of the United States in 2016, Elected as Fellow to the Administrative Law Section, American Bar Association(ABA), October 2009 and is a member of the ABA Standing Committee on International Trade in Legal Services.  She has also served as a member of the Vera Institute of Justice and the Lancaster County Attorney's Office - Lancaster County Community Advisory Group for the study of Prosecution and Racial Justice (PRJ); Chair, Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice Section, American Bar Association(ABA) 2014-15;  ABA Immigration Committee, Administrative Law Section Liaison, 2005-2009; Chair (1998-99), Immigration Section, American Association of Law Schools,  Executive Committee member 1999-2000; Chair, Immigration Committee, Administrative Law Section, American Bar Association, 1993- 2006.

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