South entrance to law college

Nebraska Law offers several joint degree programs for students interested in pursuing an additional course of study outside of the law college.  Pursuit of a dual degree typically results in a 4 year course of study that concludes in receiving both a juris doctor degree and a masters degree. 


Juris Doctorate and Master of Arts in Social Gerontology

Joint Degree Program

The Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Social Gerontology joint degree program (“J.D./M.A.”) is designed for law students who desire to develop a unique expertise and knowledge in the field of elder law, or who are considering an administrative position in the area of gerontology and seek to bring a legal perspective to their administrative work.



When do I apply?

New students: JD students: M.A. Students:

Must apply independently for admission to both the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Law and the Department of Gerontology through Graduate Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. The student must indicate that he or she is applying for admission to the J.D./M.A. joint degree program and must comply with the application requirements of both the College and the Department.

A student who already is enrolled in the J.D. degree program at the College of Law may apply for admission to the joint degree program prior to the completion of more that three semesters as a full-time J.D. Student A student who already is enrolled in the M.A. in Social Gerontology degree program
may apply for admission to the joint degree program prior to completion of more than 18 hours of courses  A student may not receive J.D.degree credit for any courses taken at the College of Law prior to admission to the College of Law.

Degree Requirements

 

Gerontology Courses Required
for Joint Degree Students

The College of Law normally requires 93 credit hours for the J.D. degree. The Department of Gerontology normally requires 36 hours for the M.A. degree. A joint degree student will receive both J.D. and M.A. credit for nine hours of law courses and nine hours of gerontology courses

A joint degree program student must complete the required first-year curriculum at the College of Law and the upper division courses required of all J.D. degree-seeking students. In addition, a joint degree student must complete the following additional law courses:

Elder Law (3 hours)
Wills & Trusts (3 hours)
Individual Income Tax (4 hours) (prerequisite for Estate Planning)
Estate Planning (3 hours)
One of the following three courses:
Law & Medicine, Law of Patient & Provider, or Bioethics (3 hours)
Applied Social Gerontology (3 hours)
Psychology of Adult Development & Aging (3 hours)
Programs & Services for the Elderly (3 hours)
Practicum (3 hours)
Graduate Seminar in Statistical Applications (3 hours)
Dying, Death and Grieving (3 hours)
Structural Equation Modeling (3 hours)
* or Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours) **
* not required for non-thesis option
** can be substituted for the Structural Equation Modeling course for those pursuing a non-thesis option
Downloadable PDF

The Juris Doctor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

Joint Program (“J.D./Graduate Gerontology Certificate”)

Is designed for law students who desire a broader perspective on the social, psychological and health issues that confront the elderly and the social programs and services that are available to support the needs of the elderly population.

When do I apply?

New Students: Law Students: Gerontology Students:
A new student must apply independently for admission to both the University of
Nebraska-Lincoln College of Law and the Department of Gerontology through Graduate Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. The student must indicate that he or she is applying for admission to the J.D./Graduate Gerontology Certificate joint program. The student must comply with the application requirements of both the College and the Department. If the student is admitted by both the College and the Department, then the student is automatically admitted to the joint program.
A student who already is enrolled in the J.D. degree program at the College of Law may apply for admission to the joint program provided the student has not completed more than three semesters as a full-time J.D.student. Student who already is enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology program (but who has not yet completed the requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology) may apply for admission to the joint program provided that the student has has not completed more than 12 hours of coursework toward the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology.

Degree Requirements

The College of Law normally requires 93 credit hours for the J.D. degree. The Department of Gerontology normally requires 18 hours for the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology. A student in the joint program will receive both J.D. and Graduate Certificate credit for nine hours of gerontology courses (Social Gerontology, Psychology of Adult Development & Aging, and Programs & Services for the Elderly).

A joint program student must complete the required first-year curriculum at the College of Law and the upper division courses required of all J.D. degree-seeking students. In addition, a joint program student must complete the following additional law courses:

Elder Law (3 hours)
Wills & Trusts (3 hours)
Individual Income Tax (4 hours) (prerequisite for Estate Planning)
Estate Planning (3 hours)
One of the following three courses:
Law & Medicine,
Law of Patient & Provider, or
Bioethics (3 hours each)

A student in the joint program must complete the following courses in the Department of Gerontology:

Applied Social Gerontology (3 hours)
Psychology of Adult Development & Aging (3 hours)
Programs & Services for the Elderly (3 hours)
Practicum (3 hours)
Dying, Death and Grieving (3 hours)
Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours)



Downloadable pdf

The Master of Legal Studies and Master of Arts in Social Gerontology

Joint Degree Program (“M.L.S./M.A.)

Is designed for gerontology professionals who are not interested in practicing law, but who are interested in developing a deeper understanding of the law’s impact on the elderly population.


When do I apply?

New Students: MLS Students: MA Students:
A new student must apply independently for admission to the M.L.S. degree program at
the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Law and the M.A. in Social Gerontology degree
program at the Department of Gerontology through Graduate Studies at the University of
Nebraska-Omaha. The student must indicate that he or she is applying for admission to the
M.L.S./M.A. joint degree program.
A student who already is enrolled in the M.L.S. degree program at the College of Law
may apply for admission to the joint degree program provided the student has not completed
more than 15 hours at the College of Law.
A student who already is enrolled in the M.A. in Social Gerontology degree program
through the Department of Gerontology at UNO may apply for admission to the joint degree program provided that the student has not completed more than 18 hours of courses toward
the M.A. degree.

Degree Requirements

The College of Law normally requires 33 credit hours for the M.L.S. degree. The Department of Gerontology normally requires 36 hours for the M.A. degree. A joint degree program student will receive both M.L.S. and M.A. credit for nine hours of law courses (Elder Law, Wills & Trusts, and one of the following: Law & Medicine, Law of Patient & Provider, or Bioethics). A M.L.S./M.A. joint degree program student must complete a total of 33 credit hours of courses at the College of Law. These 33 hours consist of 12 hours of elective courses and 21 hours of required courses. The required courses are:

Torts (4 hours)
First Semester Property (3 hours)
Legal Research & Writing/FLS (2 hours)
Elder Law (3 hours)
Wills & Trusts (3 hours)
One of the following three courses:
Law & Medicine,
Law of Patient & Provider, or
Bioethics (3 hours)
A joint degree program student must complete the following courses in the Department of Gerontology:

Applied Social Gerontology (3 hours)
Programs & Services for the Elderly (3 hours)
Practicum (3 hours)
Graduate Seminar in Statistical Applications (3 hours)
Dying, Death and Grieving (3 hours)
Structural Equation Modeling (3 hours)* or
Health Aspects of Aging (3 hours) **
*not required for non-thesis option
** can be substituted for the Structural Equation Modeling course for those pursuing a non-thesis option

Psychology of Adult Development & Aging (3 hours)
or Seminar on Aging and Human Behavior (3 hours)


Downloadable PDF

Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Political Science

Joint Degree Program



The world of government and politics and the world of law are closely interrelated. Students who study political institutions and processes will confront legal structures and processes. Students who seek a law degree will often encounter political institutions and processes. Students in each discipline can benefit from a better and more sophisticated understanding of the structures and processes of the other.

When do I apply?

New Students: Law Students: Masters Students:
A new student must independently apply for admission both to the College of Law and the
Graduate College and request admission to this joint degree program. Students must comply
with the application procedures of each College. If the student is accepted by both Colleges, he or she is automatically admitted to the program.
Students who are already enrolled in the College of Law, who have not completed more than 51 hours at the College of Law may apply for admission to the Graduate College through the Department of Political Science. Students who are already enrolled in a Masters program in the Department of Political Science, who have not taken more than 12 hours of courses, may apply for admission to the College of Law.

*Students must complete the first year curriculum at the College of Law beginning in the fall semester of the academic year for which they are admitted, and may not take any political science courses during that year.


Degree Requirements
The Law College requires 93 credit hours for the J.D. degree. A joint degree student must
complete a total of 84 hours at the College of Law: the standard first year curriculum of 33 hours and 51 upperclass hours.

A joint degree student will be credited with 9 hours of approved course work in the Department of Political Science toward his or her J.D. degree.

To obtain the M.A. in Political Science in the joint program, a student must pass comprehensive examinations in two of the following five areas of concentration: American Politics,Comparative Politics, International Relations, Public Administration and Political Theory. The number of hours required depends on whether the Masters is with or without a thesis. For a Revised 2007 Masters with a thesis, 30 credit hours are required.For a Masters without a thesis, 36 credit hours are required.

A full description of the programs for a Masters in Political Science is contained in the Graduate Studies Manual.
Downloadable PDF

Juris Doctor - Master of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communications

Joint Degree Program



The world of journalism and the world of law are closely interrelated. Students who study the role of media in a globalized world will confront legal structures and processes. Students who seek a law degree will often encounter processes in the media and need to understand the role of journalism in a democratic society. Students in each discipline can benefit from a better and more sophisticated understanding of the structures and processes of the other.

When do I apply?

New Students: Law Students: Masters Students:
A new student must independently apply for admission both to the College of Law and the
Graduate College and request admission to this joint degree program.
Students who are already enrolled in the College of Law, must apply for admission to the graduate college prior to completion of more than 51 hours at the College of Law. Students who are already enrolled in a Masters program in the College of Journalism and Mass Communications, may apply to the College of Law prior to the completion of more than 12 credit hours.

Students must complete the first year curriculum at the College of Law beginning in the fall semester of the academic year for which they are admitted, and may not take any journalism courses during that year. After they do so, they may take both law and journalism courses in whatever sequence they choose, subject to the requirements listed below.


Degree Requirements
The Law College requires 93 credit hours for the J.D. degree. A joint degree student must
complete a total of 84 hours at the College of Law: the standard first year curriculum of 33 hours and 51 upperclass hours.

A joint degree student will be credited with 9 hours of approved course work in the College of Revised 2010 Journalism and Mass Communications toward his or her J.D. degree.

To obtain the M.A. in Journalism and Mass Communications in the joint program, a student must choose one of the following four specializations: Professional Journalism (36 hours; professional project required); Advertising (30 hours; thesis required), Broadcasting (30 hours; thesis required), or News-Editorial (30 hours; thesis required). For a Masters with a thesis, 30 credit hours are required. For a Masters without a thesis, 36 credit hours are required.
Downloadable pdf

Juris Doctor / Masters in Public Accountancy

Joint Degree Program

When do I apply?

New Students College of Law Students CBA Students
A new student must independently apply for admission both to the College of Law and
the College of Business Administration CBA (through the Graduate College) and meet the application requirements of each College. If the student is accepted by both Colleges, he
or she is automatically admitted to the joint degree program.
Students who are already enrolled in the College of Law and who have a cumulative GPA of at least 5.500, must apply for admittion to the College of Business Administration prior to the completion of not more than 48 hours at the College of Law (33 hours of first year courses and 15 hours of upperlevelcourses). If admitted, students are automatically admitted to the joint degree program. CBA Students who have a cumulative GPA of at least a "B," must apply for admission to the College of Law prior to the completion of more than 12 credit hours twoard the MPA degree. If admitted, students are automatically admitted to the joint degree program. College of Law courses taken before admission to the College will not count toward the J.D. degree.


Course Requirements
College of Law: A student must complete a total of 87 hours at the College of Law: the standard first year curriculum (33 hours) and 54 hours of upper-level courses.

Up to 18 hours of the 87 hours of courses required at the College of Law can be used to satisfy the 36 hours required for the MPA degree, if the courses are upper-level courses which are cross-listed with other departments.

CBA: A student must complete 36 hours at the College of Business Administration Eighteen of must be accounting courses taken under the accounting course and call numbers. The 36 hours must include the following courses:

21 hours of graduate only classes, including:
15 hours of accounting graduate courses.
6 hours of accounting electives.

None of the 36 hours can be applied to reduce the 87 hours required for the JD.

Downloadable PDF

Juris Doctor – Masters of Community & Regional Planning

Joint Degree Program



The increasing complexity of issues relating to physical, economic, and social well-being in the world today and in the future calls for broader knowledge and greater depth of understanding by decision makers who are attempting to resolve those issues.

The intent of this joint degree program is to prepare students for a variety of professional roles including but not limited to:

  • land use planning and growth management
  • city planning and management
  • land development
  • human services planning
  • advocacy planning
  • environmental planning and management
  • mediation and conflict resolution

When do I Apply?

New Students: College of Law or MCRP Students:
Applicants to the JD/MCRP Joint Degree Program must complete the application requirements for both the JD and MCRP degree programs as though they were applying separately to each, and must be admitted to both degree programs in order to be admitted to the joint program. A first-year student in either the JD or MCRP degree program may declare interest in the joint degree program and submit an application to the other degree program, but no later than the first year of enrollment in either of the separate degree programs.

Course Requirements

A student must complete 93 credit hours at the College of Law to obtain the JD degree. A student must complete 81 hours of law courses, and may use 12 hours of Community and Regional Planning courses to satisfy the 93 credit hour requirement. The 81 credit hours required at the College of Law include the standard first year curriculum (33 hours) and 48 hours of upper-level courses.
Course Requirements - Department of Community and Regional Planning

A student must complete 48 credit hours at the Department of Community and Regional Planning to obtain the MCRP degree. A student must complete 33 hours in Community and Regional Planning course work, and may use 15 hours of courses taken at the College of Law as elective hours for the MCRP degree, providing that no other graduate-level credit hours have been stipulated by the admissions committee in the Department of Community and Regional Planning to fulfill deficiencies.
The courses required in Community and Regional Planning are:

Introduction to Planning (3 hours)
Planning Theory (3 hours)
Legal Aspects of Planning (3 hours)
Qualitative Techniques for Planners (3 hours)
Planning with GIS (3 hours)
Planning Methods and Analysis (3 hours)
Professional Planning Practice (3 hours)
Planning Studio (3 hours)
Elective (3 hours)

Master's Thesis (6 hours).
or
Professional Project (6 hours).


Juris Doctor / Law and Psychology

Joint Degree Program


Program Requirements

Each student's study and research plan is individual, and the courses taken and research topics examined may change over the course of a student's career. Students are expected to meet the expectations of three programs: 1) the Law-Psychology Program, 2) the student's Core Discipline program, and 3) the Law College. The requirements listed here are those expected by the Law-Psychology Program. While they likely overlap substantially with the requirements of the Core Discipline program, they are not intended to replace those requirements. Ultimately, a student's doctoral supervisory committee (normally appointed near the end of the master's equivalency research project) determines what coursework requirements are necessary for the student to complete the Program.

The Law and Psychology Program is a research-focused program of study. Students in all tracks must be involved in ongoing research from the time that they enter the program until the time that they finish their dissertations. Students may be involved in their mentor's research, first year projects, master's equivalency research, projects with other faculty members, projects with other students, or dissertation work. Students report on their research ideas, problems, and completed projects in the program biweekly brownbag meetings. Attendance at these meetings is mandatory for all students unless there is a course conflict or other professional conflict that cannot be overcome. Please consult the program director for more information on declaring conflicts unresolvable.

Most Psychology Department and Law College courses are available to students in all program tracks. However, there are exceptions; certain clinical psychology courses are open to clinical students only and some Law College courses are open to J.D. students only.

Interdisciplinary Courses

The core coursework for the Law-Psychology program consists of a series of Interdisciplinary Courses. The following cross-listed courses are available to dual degree students and credits in these courses count toward degrees in both programs. For M.L.S. students, 12 credits can count toward both degrees; for J.D. students, 18 credits can count toward both degrees.

Law and Behavioral Science (3 credits). General issues in the interaction between law and behavioral sciences; discussion of the use/misuse/nonuse of behavioral sciences in the law, with attention to ways of making behavioral science input most useful; evaluation of the contribution of theory and research in psychology to the policy formulation process.

Topics in Law and Psychology (3 credits - may be taken twice for dual credit and a third time for psychology credit only). In-depth analysis of specific psycholegal topics. Previous courses have included: Legal Decision Making, Eyewitness Memory, and Damages.

Mental Health Law (3 credits). Critical review of the mental health laws throughout the nation and their psychological foundations. Emphasis is placed on research that illuminates problems encountered by the mental health system and the relevant law. Topics include the insanity defense, competency to stand trial, guardianship/conservatorship and civil commitment. This course can fulfill the seminar requirement for J.D. students.

Psycholegal Research (3 credits - may be taken twice). A substantial research and writing project on a psycholegal topic generally including a law review quality legal analysis, an empirical study, and their integration. The research is supervised and approved by a faculty member in the Law-Psychology Program with joint appointments in both the Law College and the Psychology Department (currently Bornstein, Brank, Schopp, or Wiener). These credits are typically used to complete the requirements for the MERP. Note that no credit will be awarded for projects undertaken for 6 credits until the entire project has been completed.

Practicum

Students may participate in a practicum for up to 2 semesters (6 credits). The purposes of the practicum are as follows:

  • To familiarize students with real-world settings, in order to generate research questions of applied significance.
  • To give students experience in working in organizations to build an appreciation of the practical problems of field research, knowledge diffusion, and application.

These placements are pursuant to contracts with state and community agencies. Previous placements have included: Courts, Governor's Office, Health and Human Services, Department of Public Institutions, Nebraska Mental Health Association, Department of Social Services, the legislature's Health and Social Services Committee, and Lancaster County Public Defender's Office. Placements should be multidisciplinary and educational. The nature of the practicum training must be consistent with the focus of the Program. Agency staff and Law-Psychology faculty provide student supervision.

M.A. COURSEWORK

A total of 36 credits are requires for the M.A. The following courses are required, unless otherwise noted.

3 Interdisciplinary Law-Psychology Courses

  • Law and Behavioral Sciences: Required for all students
  • Mental Health Law: Strongly recommended but not required, consult with advisor
  • Topics in Law and Psychology: Several "Topics" courses are offered, including Legal Decision-Making, Damages, and Eyewitness Memory

3 Proseminars

  • Social Proseminar
  • Cognitive Proseminar
  • Elective Proseminar: The student's Core Discipline may dictate this choice. For example, developmental law-psychology students must take both Developmental Proseminars.

2 Statistics Courses

  • Psychology 941
  • Psychology 942

Note that most students opt to take additional statistics courses, and most advisors and doctoral committees may require it as part of the student's Program of Courses

Psycholegal Research (6 credits)

Electives (6 credits)
Chosen based on students' interests and Core Discipline Program requirements. Common choices include:

  • Social Cognition
  • Emotion and Motivation
  • Group Dynamics
  • Social Psychology Research Methods
  • Questionnaire Design
  • Program Evaluation
  • "Topics" Courses
  • "Readings" Courses: These are designed with an advisor based on topics of mutual interest. Students register for Psych Lit I or II.

Law-Psychology Masters Degree Checklist

M.L.S. Degree Checklist

Ph.D. COURSEWORK

A minimum of 90 credit hours are required for a Ph.D. The following are required unless otherwise noted. Note that these requirements overlap with the M.A. requirements, and courses taken in pursuit of the M.A. also count toward the Ph.D.

Four Interdisciplinary Law-Psychology courses (18 credits)

Many of these courses will count toward both the law degree and the psychology degree. M.L.S. students can only get dual credit for 12 Interdisciplinary credits, and the law school counts Psycholegal Research in this category. Therefore, M.L.S. students CANNOT take all of these courses for dual credit.

  • Law and Behavioral Sciences
  • Topics in Law-Psychology
  • Topics in Law-Psychology
  • Mental Health Law

 

Four Proseminars (12 credits)

  • Social Proseminar
  • Cognitive Proseminar
  • Elective Proseminar
  • Elective Proseminar

 

Note that the Electives may be dictated by the student's Core Discipline requirements, advisor, or supervisory committee. Elective options include: History and Philosophy of Psychology, Developmental, Sensation and Perception, Sensation and Perception, and Psychopathology.

Statistics (9 credits)

  • Psychology 941 (3 credits)
  • Psychology 942 (3 credits)
  • Electives. Options include: Multilevel Modeling, Structural Equation Modeling, Qualitative Methods, Program Evaluation, and one-credit summer courses on varying topics. Students are often encouraged to take a statistics class outside of the Psychology Department.

 

Completion of these credits satisfies the Graduate Studies language/research tool requirement.

Statistics "minor": Students may pursue a concentration in statistics. Those interested should consult with their advisor and Professor Cal Garbin, director of the concentration. The minor requires 18 credits.

Ethics (2 credits)

  • Introduction to Professional Ethics for Psychologists OR the Graduate Studies course on Responsible Conduct in Research (1 credit)
  • Advanced Professional Ethics for Psychologists, Law-Psychology (1 credit)

Teaching Methods in Psychology (1 credit)

Electives
Students must consult their Core Discipline Program requirements to ensure that they have successfully met those expectations. Beyond that, students are encouraged to choose electives based on their career goals and interests.

Readings Courses: Students may set up Readings classes with individual professors on topics of mutual interest and register for these classes as Psych Lit I or Psych Lit II.

Research Credits: The Department and Program offer a number of course listings for research credits. These include Psych Lit, Psycholegal Research, Research Other Than Thesis (ROTT), and Dissertation Credits. Typically, students take certain credits for certain projects. For example, students typically take ROTT credits for their first-year research project and Psycholegal Research credits to work on their Master's-equivalent project (MERP). Dissertation credits are reserved for work on dissertation projects. Students should seek help from their advisor or fellow students if confused about which credits to take.

Brownbag (1 credit): Students in the Law-Psychology Program are required to attend "Brownbag" sessions while they are in residence at UNL. At some time during their program of study, students can register for 1 credit of Psych Lit I as a result of participation in the "Brownbag" series.

Practicum (6 credits maximum)

Note: You must be registered for at least one credit until you graduate.

Law-Psychology Ph.D. Checklist

J.D. INFORMATION

The requirements set out below are intended to provide a general overview of the requirements for the J.D. All law students should consult the Law Student Handbook for a list of the official requirements for their class. If you have questions, contact the Dean's Office at the Law School. A total of 96 credit hours are required for a J.D., including the following:

First Year Curriculum (33 credits)

Upper-Level Courses (60 credits)

  • Constitutional Law (taken in the fall of the second year)
  • Legal Profession
  • Seminar (chosen from several options)
  • Skills (chosen from several options)
  • Electives

Recommendations:

  • Good foundational courses include but are not limited to: Corporations, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Remedies, Wills and Trusts and a statutory course (Tax, Environmental Law, a course examining the Uniform Commercial Code, etc.)
  • Electives commonly chosen include but are not limited to: Administrative Law, Employment Law, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Negotiations, Mediation, Law and Economics, Law and Medicine, Legislation Seminar and Trial Advocacy.

Juris Doctor/Master of Public Health Joint Degree Program

Downloadable PDF

The Juris Doctor and Master of Public Health joint degree program (“JD/MPH”) is designed to prepare students for a variety of professional roles in which the knowledge, skills and expertise in law, public health and health care systems are important. 

Public health, public policy, and biomedical ethics are at the forefront of issues in America today.  Ongoing efforts at health care reform by policymakers require lawyers with health care expertise to generate legal solutions to issues of health care access and quality, patient protection, and privacy. The work environment is emerging as a significant factor in health, prompting fresh attention to city planning and land use regulation.  Occupational injuries continue to plague America’s workforce.  Environmental degradation threatens the health of future generations. A JD/MPH degree can prepare graduates for leadership in the myriad public health issues confronted by society.

Admission Criteria

Separate applications will be processed through both college admission systems and the decision for joint degree admission will be coordinated by the admission directors for the JD and MPH programs only after the applicant has been accepted by both programs, and complies with application requirements of both the JD and CoPH.

Students already enrolled in the JD degree program may apply for admission to the joint degree program provided the student is in good academic standing and has not completed more than 3 semesters as a full-time student in the COL. Students already enrolled in the MPH degree program in the CoPH may apply for admission to the joint degree program provided the student has a cumulative grade point average of at least a “B” and has not completed more than 18 hours of coursework toward the MPH degree.

The campus on which the student is registered will bill student tuition and fees.

Curriculum Requirements

A student in the dual degree program must complete the first-year curriculum at the College of Law beginning in the fall semester of the academic year for which the student is admitted before taking any public health courses.  After successfully completing the first-year curriculum at the College of Law, the student may take both law and public health courses in a sequence that meets the approval of the College of Law and the College of Public Health. The Service Learning and Capstone Experience will follow the guidelines of the UNMC MPH Program as described in the College of Public Health Student Handbook.

A student in the dual degree program will select an MPH area of concentration that best suits the student’s interest with the knowledge that some mandatory and recommended courses may be required.  Each concentration requires 12 hours of concentration courses, 6 hours of elective courses, and 6 hours of service learning/capstone.A dual degree student will receive both J.D. and MPH credit for six hours of law courses and nine hours of public health courses for a total of 15 hours of shared coursework.

Any three of the following public health courses will apply towards a JD:

Course number

Course name

Credit hours

CPH 500 / HPRO 830

Foundations of Public Health

3

CPH 501 / HPRO 860

Health Behavior

3

CPH 502 / HSRA 873

Health Services Administration

3

CPH 503 / ENV 892

Public Health, Environment, & Society

3

CPH 504 / EPI 820

Epidemiology in Public Health

3

CPH 505 / HPRO 805

Applied Research in Public Health

3

CPH 506 / BIOS 806

Biostatistics I

3

Any two of the following law courses will apply towards an MPH:

Administrative Law (Law 633/G; 3 cr hr)

Agricultural Environmental Law (Law 722; 3 cr hr)

Agricultural Law (Law 704/G; 3 cr hr)

Bioethics & Law. (Law 684/G; 2 cr hr)

Constitutional Law II (Law 732/G; 3 cr hr)

Elder Law (Law 602; 3 cr hr)

Environmental Ethics and Law Seminar (Law 623/G; 3 cr hr)

Environmental Law (Law 641/G; 3 cr hr)

Family Law (Law 630/G; 3 cr hr)

Federal Regulation of Food Safety (Law 679; 3 cr hr)

Health Care Finance Seminar (Law 701/G; 3 cr hr)

Land Use Planning (Law 699/G; 3 cr hr)

Law & Medicine (Law 703/G; 3 cr hr)

Legislation and the Political Process (Law 744; 3 cr hr)

Mental Health Law (Law 763/G; 3 cr hr)

Mental Health Law Seminar (Law 772/G; 3 cr hr)

Products Liability (Law 755/G; 3 cr hr)

State and Local Government Law (Law 788/G; 3 cr hr)

Statutory Interpretation: Practice and Policy  (Law 728; 3 cr hr)


JOINT JD/MBA PROGRAM



When do I apply?

New students: JD students: College of Business Administration Students:

A new student must independently apply for admission both to the College of Law and the College of Business Administration (through the Graduate College) and meet the application requirements of each College.  If the student is accepted by both Colleges, he or she is automatically admitted to the joint degree program.   

Students who are already enrolled in the College of Law and have completed not more than 48 hours at the College of Law (33 hours of first year courses and 15 hours of upper-level courses), may apply for admission to the College of Business Administration (through the Graduate College), and, if admitted, are automatically admitted to the joint degree program.  Law students must begin coursework in the College of Business Administration no later than the fourth semester of law school.

Students who are already enrolled in the MBA program, who have not completed more than 12 hours of MBA courses, and who have received a grade of B in each such course may apply for admission to the College of Law and, if admitted, are automatically admitted to the joint degree program.

Degree Requirements

Course Requirements- College of Business Administration

A student must complete a total of 84 hours at the College of Law:  the standard first year curriculum (33 hours) and 51 hours of upper-level courses. 

The 51 hours of upper-level courses must include the following required courses:

(1)  Constitutional Law I (4 hours) (this course must be taken during the first semester of the academic year immediately following the student's first year at the College of Law;

(2)  Legal Profession (3 hours) (this course may be taken any time after the student's first year at the College of Law);

(3)  a seminar offered at the College of Law that satisfies the College of Law's substantial writing requirement (the seminar can be taken at any time after the student's first year at the College of Law); and        

(4) an upper level professional skills course  (3 hours) (this course may be taken any time after the student’s first year at the College of Law.)  The following courses meet this requirement: Advanced Legal Research, Advanced Trial Advocacy, Advocacy in Mediation, Appellate Advocacy, Business Planning, Client Interviewing and Counseling, Civil Clinic, Criminal Clinic, Construction Practice, Entrepreneurship Clinic, Family Law Practice, Immigration Clinic, Mediation, Negotiations, Pretrial Litigation, Trial Advocacy, and Externship (if approved by the Dean).

A student must register for all upper-level courses using the law course and class numbers unless the course will also count toward the MBA degree.  In that situation, the student must register for the course using the "G" course numbers.

Up to 15 hours of the 84 hours of courses taken at the College of Law can be used to satisfy the 48 hours required for the MBA degree.

A student must complete 48 hours to receive the MBA degree.  Of those 48 hours, 15 hours may be College of Law courses.  The remaining 33 hours must be College of Business Administration courses.  The specific requirements are as follows:

(1) 30 hours of MBA core requirements (GRBA 808, 809, 811, 812, 813, 814, 815, 816, 851, 853).

(2) 9 hours of breadth courses. 3 hours must be a course which is cross-listed with a business department and law. 3 hours may be a College of Law skills related course. Please refer to the course options listed in Section II (4) above. The remaining 3 hours must be from a business department that is different than the business department used in the course cross-listed with law.

(3) 9 hours of electives consisting of 6 hours of Contracts and 3 hours of Torts.

If a student completed Law courses that count toward the MBA degree requirements prior to admission to the MBA, these courses should not be listed on the Memorandum of Courses (MOC) filed with Graduate Studies. If a student takes Law courses that count toward the MBA degree requirements after admission to the MBA, the student should enroll in the “G” section of the Law course and it should be listed on the MOC. Please see Section V below for more information regarding Memorandum of Courses.

Course Sequence

Academic Eligibility

Students must complete the first year curriculum at the College of Law beginning in the fall semester of the academic year for which they were admitted.  After they do so, they are free to take both law and business courses in whatever sequence they choose, subject to the requirements listed above.

A student in the joint degree program must receive at least a grade of B in each course taken at the College of Business Administration.  A student who fails to satisfy this requirement will be dropped from the joint degree program and cannot apply for readmission to the program.  A student who is dropped from the joint degree program can still pursue an MBA degree and a JD degree but must meet the normal requirements for each degree.  Those requirements are 48 hours for the MBA degree and 93 hours for the JD degree with no dual credit for any courses.

Progress Evaluations

Conferral of Degrees

Before the end of a student's first year at the College of Law, the student must submit a course proposal to the Associate Dean of the College of Law.  After the first year at the College of Law, the student must meet with the Associate Dean of the College of Law each semester to discuss the student's progress toward completing the requirements of the joint degree program and also to discuss the student's course selections for the following semester.  This meeting must take place prior to the time the student registers for the following semester. 

When the student reaches the halfway point in his/her MBA studies, the student must file a Memorandum of Courses (MOC) with their MBA Advisor.  For purposes of the MOC, the halfway point is defined as prior to completion of the 25th credit hour toward the MBA degree.  It is extremely important that the MOC be filed in a timely fashion; the failure to do so will result in a delay in graduation. 

A student enrolled in the joint degree program will normally receive a JD degree only after the student satisfies the joint degree program requirements for both the JD and MBA degrees.  A student must file a separate application for each degree.