Nebraska Law’s curriculum offers students a traditional foundation in legal analysis and reasoning and a wide range of elective upper-level courses that include hands-on practical experience through clinics and externships. The first-year curriculum provides full-year courses in Civil Procedure, Property, and Contracts and semester-long courses in Torts and Criminal Law, and Perspectives in International Law. In addition to this strong core curriculum, first-year students immerse themselves in a Foundational Legal Skills course that focuses on legal research and writing, professionalism, career planning, and ethics.

The upper-level curriculum offers a broad array of choices for students as they begin to explore future careers. Students can concentrate in a specialty area, such as litigation skills, business law, solo and small firm practice, intellectual property, space law, environmental law, and so forth. Any student can create an individualized program of study supervised by a professor. Many students also get real-world experience by participating in a clinic or doing an externship. Nebraska Law offers clinics in civil practice, criminal practice, immigration practice, and as advisors to entrepreneurs and start-up businesses. In these clinics, students represent real clients under the supervision of a professor.

First Year Curriculum

Civil Procedure

Law 516/G-517/G; 6 cr.-3 cr. each semester

An introduction to the theory and practice of litigation in federal and state courts. Topics studied include jurisdiction, pleading, joinder, discovery,motion practice,the right to jury trial, trial and post-trial motions, appellate review and preclusion doctrine.

Meet the Civ Pro Professors
Professor Kirst
Professor Kirst
Professor Lenich
Professor Lenich

Contracts

Law 501/G-502/G; 6 cr.-3 cr. each semester

The basic principles governing the creation, interpretation and enforcement of private agreements.

Meet the Contracts Professors 
Professor Denicola
Professor Denicola
Professor Works
Professor Works

Criminal Law

Law 508/G; 3 cr. fall semester

Substantive criminal law, focusing on the theoretical foundations, general principles and doctrines that govern the rules of liability and defenses, both in the common law tradition and under the Model Penal Code.

Meet the Crim Law Professors

Professor Gardner
Professor Gardner
Professor Schopp
Professor Schopp

Foundational Legal Skills: Research, Writing, and Professionalism

Law 513/G-514/G; 6 cr.-2 cr. in the fall; 4 cr. in the spring

The emphasis of this course is on the development of legal research and writing skills; writing is the lawyer's most commonly used skill, and effective writing rests on effective research. Communicating like a lawyer, however, means not only communicating professionally but also conducting oneself ethically. In addition to providing sustained and intensive instruction on legal research and writing, this course introduces students to many facets of professionalism and to the skills necessary to make ethical and professional choices.

Meet the Foundational Legal Skills Professor

Professor Lawson
Professor Lawson

International Perspectives in the U.S. Legal System: Practicing Law in a Global Legal Environment

Law 518/G; 2 cr spring semester

This course will help students situate their study of traditional first-year courses in an international context and to prepare for legal practice in a global legal environment, including an understanding of how to handle the inevitable treaty and foreign law issues that can arise in the practice of virtually every area of law. The course will cover the sources of international law and the relationship of international law (particularly treaties) to the U.S. legal system. It will also include an overview of conflict of law rules, a survey of differences and similarities in the major legal systems of the world, and a comparative examination of how foreign legal systems regulate other areas of law studied in the first year, such as torts, contracts, criminal procedure and civil procedure.

Meet the International Perspective Professors

Professor Lepard
Professor Lepard
Professor Schaefer
Professor Schaefer
Professor Beard
Professor Beard

Property

Law 505/G-506/G; 6 cr.-3 cr. each semester

Depending upon the section, the course may include problems in possession, gifts of personal property, bona fide purchasers of personal property including recording and priorities, estates in land, landlord and tenant, the modern land transaction, controlling the use of land, easements, licenses and equitable servitudes and constitutional limitations on the power of government to restrict individual economic liberties.

Meet the Property Professors

Professor Duncan
Professor Duncan
Professor Medill
Professor Medill
Professor Shoemaker
Professor Shoemaker

Torts

Law 503; 4 cr.-fall semester

The legal protection afforded in civil proceedings against interference with the security of one's person, property, relations and other intangible interests. The course covers the substantive principles that govern tort claims (ranging from claims for intentional wrongdoing, to negligence claims, to claims that the defendant is strictly liable for harms caused to the plaintiff), and further explores the theoretical bases and practical implications of such claims.

Meet the Torts Professors

Professor Burkstrand-Reid
Professor Burkstrand
Professor Lawson
Professor Lawson
Professor Zellmer
Professor Zellmer

Upper Class Courses

Upperclass Course Descriptions

Alternative Dispute Resolution

  • Advocacy in Mediation
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Arbitration
  • Mediation
  • Negotiations

Business and Corporate

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Antitrust and Trade Regulation
  • Banking Law
  • Business Associations
  • Business Planning
  • Clinical Practice: Entrepreneurship
  • Construction Law
  • Construction Practice
  • Copyright Law
  • Corporate Finance and Governance
  • Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Corporate Tax
  • Employee Benefits Law
  • Employment Law
  • Entertainment Law
  • Health Care Finance Seminar
  • Insurance Law
  • International Business Transactions
  • International Law
  • International Tax
  • Negotiations
  • Partnership Tax
  • Securities Brokers, Mutual Funds and Investment Advisors
  • Securities Regulation
  • Sports Law
  • State and Local Tax
  • Tax Policy Seminar
  • Unfair Competition

Civil Rights

  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • Economic Justice
  • Employment Discrimination Law
  • Gender Issues and the Law
  • Immigration Law
  • International Gender Issues
  • International Human Rights Law Seminar
  • Law & Liberty in Time of Crisis
  • Sex-Based Discrimination

Commercial Law

  • Banking Law
  • Bankruptcy
  • Commercial Law: Sales
  • Electronic Commerce
  • Payment Systems
  • Real Estate Transactions
  • Secured Transactions

Constitutional Law

  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • Conflict of Laws
  • Constitutional Law I
  • Constitutional Law II
  • Constitutional Problems Seminar
  • Criminal Procedure
  • Family Law
  • Federal Courts
  • Law & Liberty in Time of Crisis
  • Native American Law
  • Native American Law Seminar
  • Sex-Based Discrimination
  • State & Local Government Law

Criminal Law

  • Capital Punishment
  • Clinical Practice: Criminal
  • Criminal Law II: White Collar Crime
  • Criminal Procedure
  • Criminal Sanctions Seminar
  • Juvenile Law

Elder Law

  • Bioethics and the Law
  • Elder Law
  • Emerging Family Law Issues
  • Estate Planning
  • Estate Planning Practice
  • Family Law
  • Family Law Practice
  • Health Care Finance Seminar
  • Insurance Law
  • The Law of Provider and Patient

Employment/Labor Law

  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • Employee Benefits Law
  • Employment Discrimination Law
  • Employment Law
  • Immigration Law
  • Labor and Employment Law: Theory and Practice
  • Labor Law

Environmental and Natural Resource Law

  • Administrative Law
  • Agricultural Environmental Law
  • Agricultural Law
  • Animals and Agricultural Production: Law and Policy
  • Environmental Ethics and Law Seminar
  • Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law and Water Resource Management Seminar
  • Farm and Ranch Taxation
  • Federal Regulation of Food Safety
  • Land Use Planning
  • Natural Resources Law
  • Principles of Regulation
  • Rural Development & Energy Law
  • Water Law
  • Water Law Planning & Policy

Family Law

  • Elder Law
  • Emerging Family Law Issues
  • Estate Planning
  • Estate Planning Practice
  • Family Law
  • Family Law Practice
  • Juvenile Law
  • Sex-Based Discrimination

Health Care Law

  • Bioethics and the Law
  • Elder Law
  • Health Care Finance Seminar
  • Insurance Law
  • Law and Medicine
  • The Law of Provider and Patient
  • Public Health Law

Intellectual Property Law

  • Antitrust Law
  • Copyright Law
  • Cyberlaw
  • Entertainment Law
  • International Intellectual Property Law
  • Mass Communication Law
  • Patent Law
  • Science and the Law
  • Unfair Competition

International and Comparative Law

  • Arms Control: Problems of Law and Technology
  • American Foreign Relations Seminar
  • Comparative Law
  • Export Control: International Traffic in Arms Regulation
  • Forced Migration & Human Rights
  • International Business Transactions
  • International Gender Issues
  • International Human Rights Law Seminar
  • International Intellectual Property Law
  • International Law
  • International Satellite Communications
  • International Telecommunications Law: Cyber Warfare
  • International Trade Law
  • Introduction to European Union Law
  • Refugee and Asylum Law and Practice
  • Transnational and International Criminal Law

Legal Perspectives and Ethics

  • Bioethics and Law
  • Constitutional History
  • Economic Justice
  • Elder Law
  • Empirical Legal Studies
  • Gender Issues in the Law
  • Gender, Race and Class Issues in the Law
  • Jurisprudence
  • Law and Behavioral Science
  • Law and Literature
  • Legal Profession
  • Mental Health Law Seminar
  • Psycholegal Research (Joint degree students only)
  • Science and the Law
  • Sex-Based Discrimination
  • Statutory Interpretation: Practice and Policy
  • Topics in Law & Psychology

Litigation and Dispute Resolution

  • Administrative Law
  • Advanced Legal Research
  • Advanced Torts
  • Advanced Trial Advocacy
  • Advocacy in Mediation
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Appellate Advocacy
  • Arbitration
  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • Client Interviewing and Counseling
  • Clinical Practice: Civil
  • Clinical Practice: Criminal
  • Clinical Practice: Immigration
  • Conflict of Laws
  • Criminal Procedure
  • Evidence
  • Federal Courts
  • Labor and Employment Law: Theory and Practice
  • Mediation
  • Negotiations
  • Pretrial Litigation
  • Products Liability
  • Remedies and Damages
  • Representing the Spanish-Speaking Client
  • Style and Composition in Legal Writing
  • Trial Advocacy

Property and Real Estate Law

  • Agricultural Environmental Law
  • Banking Law
  • Bankruptcy Law
  • Construction Law
  • Construction Law Practice
  • Copyright Law
  • Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law & Water Resources Seminar
  • Estate Planning
  • Farm & Ranch Taxation
  • International Intellectual Property Law
  • Insurance Law
  • Land Use Planning
  • Natural Resources Law
  • Partnership Taxation
  • Patent Law
  • Real Estate Transactions
  • Rural Development and Energy Law
  • Secured Transactions
  • State and Local Tax
  • Unfair Competition
  • Water Law
  • Water Law Planning & Policy
  • Wills and Trusts

Public Interest Law

  • Administrative Law
  • Civil Rights Litigation
  • Clinical Practice: Civil
  • Clinical Practice: Criminal
  • Clinical Practice: Entrepreneurship
  • Clinical Practice: Immigration
  • Constitutional Law I
  • Constitutional Law II
  • Constitutional Problems Seminar
  • Education Law
  • Elder Law
  • Employment Discrimination Law
  • Environmental Law courses (see above)
  • Federal Regulation of Food Safety
  • Forced Migration & Human Rights
  • Gender Issues in the Law
  • Health Care Finance Seminar
  • Immigration Law
  • Juvenile Law
  • Native American Law
  • Native American Law Seminar
  • Refugee and Asylum Law and Practice
  • Sex-Based Discrimination
  • Tribal Gaming Law

Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law

  • Arms Control: Problems of Law and Technology
  • Aviation Law
  • Cyberlaw
  • Domestic Telecommunications Law
  • European Regulation of Space and Telecomunications Law
  • Export Control: International Traffic in Arms Regulation
  • International Satellite Communications
  • International Telecommunications Law: Cyber Warfare
  • Introduction to European Union Law
  • Law and Economics
  • National Security Law
  • National Security Space Law
  • National Space Legislation
  • Principles of Regulation
  • Space & Satellite Business Law
  • Space Law
  • Spectrum Management Law and Policy

Tax Law

  • Business Planning
  • Corporate Tax
  • Employee Benefits Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Farm and Ranch Tax
  • Individual Income Tax
  • International Tax
  • Partnership Tax
  • State and Local Tax
  • Wills and Trusts

Upper-class Required Courses

  • Constitutional Law I
  • Legal Profession
  • Seminar
  • Professional Skills Course (1) from the following:
    • Advanced Legal Research
    • Advanced Trial Advocacy
    • Advocacy in Mediation
    • Appellate Advocacy
    • Business Planning
    • Client Interviewing & Counseling
    • Civil Clinic
    • Criminal Clinic
    • Construction Practice
    • Entrepreneurship Clinic
    • Family Law Practice
    • Mediation
    • Negotiations
    • Pretrial Litigation
    • Trial Advocacy
    • Externship (approved by the Dean)

Clinics

Contact Us

Kevin Ruser
Civil Clinic
172 Welpton Courtroom Building
University of Nebraska
P.O. Box 830902
Lincoln, NE 68583-0902
Phone: 402.472.3271

The College of Law currently offers three in-house Clinics taught by full-time resident faculty members: the Civil Clinic, the Criminal Clinic, and the Immigration Clinic. Clinic students gain insight into the legal and ethical responsibilities of both prosecutors and defense attorneys in criminal cases that will benefit students, regardless of the context in which they eventually practice law. Students are eligible to enroll in the Clinics once they have reached senior standing.


Civil Clinic
Civil Clinic

The Civil Clinic was established in 1975. Clinic students represent low-income clients in a wide variety of civil and administrative cases selected by the faculty for potential litigation and trial experience and maximum pedagogical benefit. Students' caseloads are designed to approximate the types of matters they might handle as new lawyers in a variety of practice settings. Depending on the clients' needs and the nature of the cases, students will interview clients, file pleadings, conduct informal and formal discovery, try cases, and argue appeals.

 

 

 

Criminal Clinic

The Criminal Clinic was established in 1979 and is one of the few prosecution Clinics in the country. Because the Clinic carries the burden of proof in all its cases, Clinic students gain insight into the legal and ethical responsibilities of both prosecutors and defense attorneys in criminal cases that will benefit students, regardless of the context in which they eventually practice law. Under the guidance of resident faculty, Clinic students prosecute misdemeanor and felony cases out of the Lancaster County Attorney's office. The focus of the Criminal Clinic is trial practice, with jury trials occurring frequently. Clinic students appear in court nearly every week during their time in the Clinic, and are lead counsel in all cases.


Entrepreneurship Clinic

The Entrepreneurship Clinic opened in January 2013. Clinic students advise and represent startup business clients in a variety of early-stage legal matters, including entity formation, contract drafting and review, intellectual property protection, real estate, financing, regulatory, compliance and other transactional matters. Students will develop practical skills necessary for the effective practice of transactional law, gain an understanding of entrepreneurs as clients and the interplay of legal, ethical and practical considerations that are required to effectively advise them, and develop relationships with individuals and organizations in Nebraska¹s entrepreneurship community applicable to such student¹s professional and educational goals.

Civil Clinic
Immigration Clinic

The Immigration Clinic was established in 1998 and allows students an in-depth, hands-on experience representing immigration clients before federal immigration agencies and courts. As in the other Clinics, students in the Immigration Clinic are lead counsel in all cases, and appear with and on behalf of clients during agency interviews or court proceedings. The types of cases handled are those typically presented by low-income immigrants, such as family-based immigrant matters, Violence Against Women Act cases, deportation defense, affirmative and defense asylum applications, and Special Immigrant Juvenile Visa cases.

Concentrations

The Program of Concentrated Study at the College of Law is designed for students who seek a particular focus during their time at the Law College. A student who wishes to focus on a particular area of the law may work with a faculty member who teaches in the area to develop an individualized Program of Concentrated Study. The purpose of a Program of Concentrated Study is threefold: (1) to recommend those courses a faculty member believes are important for the study and development of skills, values and doctrines in a particular area, (2) to sequence those courses in such a way that students will gain maximum benefit from the skills, values and doctrines the courses teach; and (3) to recognize the achievements of those students completing a Program of Concentrated Study.

The specific requirements for an individualized Program of Concentrated Study are as follows:

  1. An individualized Program of Concentrated Study must be developed by a student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and is subject to approval by the Dean and his or her designee. The attached Program of Concentrated Study form must be completed and submitted to the Dean's Office. The Dean's office will record faculty sponsorship and the particular requirements of the individualized program.
  2. An individualized Program of Concentrated Study must consist of at least fifteen (15) credit hours in no fewer than five upper level courses that have been identified by a faculty member as central to the identified area. While a faculty member establishing a Program of Concentrated Study may require more course work than the five-course, 15 credit hour minimum, and may require sequencing of courses, the scope and contour of any Program of Concentrated Study should be consistent with the goal of assuring that students acquire a broad-based legal education.
  3. A student must declare an intention to complete an individualized Program of Concentrated Study no later than the last day on which students may add a class during the semester beginning the student's third year. Students are encouraged to declare early to minimize problems caused by course sequencing and availability.

A student may complete no more than two Programs of Concentrated Study.

Upon successful completion of a Program of Concentrated Study, a student will receive a Certificate of Concentrated Study. A notation of successful program completion will appear on the student's transcript.

Proposal Form (PDF)


Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study

The Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study at the College of Law is designed for students who seek a focus on the legal aspects of business transactions during their time at the Law College. The Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study has three purposes:

  1. to recommend those courses the faculty believes are important for the student and to encourage students to develop the skills and knowledge of doctrines necessary to be an effective and competent attorney advising clients on business transactions;
  2. to sequence those courses in such a way that students will gain maximum benefit from the skills and doctrines the courses teach; and
  3. to recognize the achievements of those students completing the Business Program of Concentrated Study.

The faculty recognizes that, among other skills, effective and competent business lawyers must have the ability to analyze and work with substantive doctrines in a variety of areas and the ability to bring to their practices the perspectives of different schools of thought and different disciplines. Therefore, the faculty also encourages students participating in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study to take a broad sampling of courses that emphasize different areas of the law and the perspectives of different disciplines.

Students are encouraged to declare their intention to participate in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study as early as possible, so they can plan their course of studies appropriately.

The College of Law will recognize a student who successfully completes the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study by making a notation on the student's transcript and by awarding the student with a certificate of recognition at the time of the student's graduation. Completion of the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study does not certify one as an expert in business law, but merely recognizes that one has completed courses in certain basic areas essential to lawyers advising clients on business transactions.

The Dean's Office shall designate a Program Coordinator to administer the requirements of the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study. The responsibilities of the Program Coordinator include:

  1. assisting students in completing all Program requirements;
  2. considering and approving requests from individual students to take non-Program courses in fulfillment of Program requirements due to a required or recommended Program course being unavailable; and
  3. carrying out any other responsibilities necessary to administer the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study.

The Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study is designed for students who seek to develop their understanding of business law doctrine and transactional skills during their time at the College of Law.

Required Courses

In addition to successfully completing the usual requirements for graduation from the College of Law, all students in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study shall successfully complete the following courses.

  1. Accounting for Lawyers (2 credit hours) (requirement waived if the student successfully completed at least three semester hours of basic accounting as an undergraduate or graduate student)
  2. Taxation - Individual Income Tax (4 credit hours)
  3. Business Associations (3 or 4 credit hours)
  4. Taxation - Corporate (3 credit hours) [Prerequisite: Taxation-Individual Income Tax]
  5. Securities Regulation (3 credit hours) [Prerequisite: Business Associations]
  6. Business Planning (3 credit hours) [Prerequisites: Taxation-Individual Income Tax; Business Associations; Taxation-Corporate*]

The Business Planning course is the culmination of the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study. It draws on tax law, corporate law, partnership law, securities law, and other related subject areas and provides students with the opportunity to plan hypothetical but realistic business transactions.

Two additional courses are also very important for students advising small business clients: Taxation-Partnership and Estate Planning. They are not required, but they are strongly recommended.

* Students in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study must complete Securities Regulation prior to taking Business Planning. Securities Regulation is not ordinarily a prerequisite to Business Planning, but students who take the courses concurrently will not meet the requirements of the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study. Therefore, students should take Securities Regulation in their second year of law school.

Other Recommended Courses

The best business lawyers are those with a broad background in the law. No single required program can anticipate the many areas a particular lawyer might need to draw upon. We strongly encourage you to take a broad variety of courses, not just those in the business transactions area.

Students participating in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study are encouraged to take:

  • Evidence
  • At least one course with an international component
  • At least one Uniform Commercial Code course

We also recommend:

  • Arbitration
  • Employment Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Estate Planning Problems
  • Wills & Trusts

One or more of the following courses might also be of particular interest to those participating in the Business Transactions Program of Concentrated Study:

  • Antitrust and Trade Regulation
  • Banking Law
  • Criminal Law II
  • Employee Benefits Law
  • Insurance Law
  • International Business Transactions
  • Labor Law
  • Real Estate Transactions
  • Securities Brokers, Mutual Funds and Investment Advisors
  • Tax Policy Seminar
  • Taxation-Farm & Ranch
  • Taxation-International
  • Taxation-Partnership
  • Unfair Competition

Proposal Form (PDF)


Intellectual Property Law Program of Concentrated Study

The University of Nebraska College of Law offers a Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law for students who wish to focus on this dynamic and expanding area of the law. Intellectual Property Law is increasingly important to business and commerce in our global economy. Included within the scope of Intellectual Property(IP) are industrial products like machines, processes, plants, and technical know-how; high tech products such as computer software and biotechnology; entertainment products such as movies, music, and literature; information products such as databases; and the names, marks, and symbols used to identify businesses and their products and services. The Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law is open to students who wish to focus on patent law as well as to students who may choose to focus on entertainment, art, communications or related areas of law.

Intellectual Property Law

Intellectual Property Law consists primarily of three interrelated substantive areas: Patent Law, Copyright Law, and Trademark Law. A single innovation can raise issues that cut across all three of these legal regimes. In addition, IP attorneys are frequently called upon to give advice on related areas of law such as Trade Secret Law, which governs the protection of confidential commercial information, and the Right of Publicity, which governs the commercial exploitation of a person’s identity.

Patent Law. The Constitution of the United States authorizes Congress to grant inventors a limited exclusive right to their discoveries. Congress first exercised this authority in 1790. Patents may be granted to anyone who invents or discovers any new, useful, and “non-obvious” process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter. The inventor must file a patent application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), which then determines whether the invention meets the strict statutory criteria that Congress has established for the grant of a patent. If a patent is issued, the owner has the authority to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, selling, or importing the patented invention. At one time patented inventions consisted primarily of machines, manufacturing processes, and chemical compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Today, innovations in biotechnology, computer and internet-related inventions, and even methods of doing business are regularly submitted to the USPTO.

Copyright Law. The U.S. Constitution also authorizes Congress to grant authors the exclusive right to their writings. “Writings” eligible for protection under the Copyright Act include literary, musical, pictorial, and sculptural works, along with motion pictures, sound recordings, and architectural works. These broad categories include works like computer software, databases, and even some aspects of utilitarian works like consumer goods. The owner of a copyright has the exclusive right to reproduce and distribute copies of the work, as well as the exclusive right to perform and display it. All of these rights, however, are subject to the public’s right to make “fair use” of the work without the permission of the copyright owner. Unlike a patent, copyright protection does not require an application to a government agency, although the Copyright Office maintains a registration system that offers significant benefits to copyright owners. In the past two decades, the rapid development of computer technology, especially the internet, has created new opportunities for the use and dissemination of copyrighted works—and also raised questions about the scope of fair use and whether the “old” ways of thinking about copyright are adequate in a digital world.

Trademark Law. Trademarks are words or symbols used by a business on its goods or services to distinguish them from the goods or services sold by others. The protection of trademarks enables businesses to benefit from the good will they have established with their customers and also protects the customers from confusion about the source of the goods or services that they buy. Trademark protection does not require a government application, but significant advantages are available to a trademark owner who is successful in obtaining a trademark registration from the USPTO. The use of trademarks as part of internet domain names, and on web pages, and in internet advertising has generated a multitude of new issues in trademark law.

Intellectual Property Law Attorneys

Intellectual property is a vital component of the United States economy. Local, national, and international companies in nearly every industry rely on intellectual property for the success of their business, and thus also rely on attorneys well-versed in intellectual property protection, management, and enforcement. Intellectual property has become increasingly global as U.S. companies seek to expand into international markets. United States “intellectual property” industries in the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing sectors generate roughly one-third of total U.S. GDP and approximately two-thirds of total U.S. exports. The core copyright industries(music, motion picture, television, print, and software), for example, now outpace the chemical, aircraft, auto, and agricultural industries in foreign sales. The economic significance of intellectual property is reflected in the marketplace for IP attorneys. Intellectual Property Law regularly appears on the various lists of “hot” practice areas.

Intellectual property attorneys work in a variety of settings. Some work in law firms that specialize in Intellectual Property Law, offering client services in patent, copyright, trademark, and IP litigation. Increasingly, large and medium-sized general practice firms are developing their own Intellectual Property Law departments in order to offer their clients a full range of legal services. Even small firms now frequently seek to include an attorney with the expertise to offer basic IP services to clients as the need arises. In addition, large corporations that produce or consume intellectual property often have in-house IP attorneys who specialize in the particular IP needs of that organization. IP attorneys also work at research universities and government agencies.

Intellectual property attorneys perform a variety of roles for their clients or employers. They may be called on, for example, to give an opinion as to whether a particular innovation is protectable under one or another of the various forms of intellectual property law, or whether a particular business model that relies on the creation or use of intellectual property is viable. IP attorneys draft the complex patent applications and trademark registration applications that are submitted to the USPTO and then act as advocates before the agency on behalf of their clients’ claims. IP attorneys also negotiate and draft licensing agreements that allow clients to market their intellectual property to interested users or that provide access to another’s intellectual property that a client wishes to exploit. IP attorneys are also frequently litigators, initiating infringement lawsuits to protect their clients’ intellectual property rights, or defending their clients against charges of infringement brought by other intellectual property owners.

Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law

A good IP attorney must first and foremost be a good attorney. The requirements for the Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law are designed to insure that participants have the opportunity to take full advantage of the strong foundational education in law available at the University of Nebraska College of Law. Students with a particular interest in law and technology can also take advantage of the course offerings available through the College of Law’s renowned program in Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law.

Students in the Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law must successfully complete at least two of the following three courses or seminars:

  • Copyright Law
  • Patent Law
  • Trademark and Unfair Competition Law

In addition, students who complete two of the above classes must also successfully complete at least three of the following elective courses or seminars; students who complete all three of the above classes must also successfully complete at least two of the following elective courses or seminars:

  • Antitrust Law
  • Cyberlaw
  • Entertainment Law
  • International Intellectual Property Law and Remedies
  • Mass Communication Law
  • Science and Law

An alternate course may be substituted for one of the elective courses with the prior approval of the Coordinators of the Program. Participating students may receive a preference in registering for limited-enrollment classes within the scope of the Program.

Students who may be interested in participating in the Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law are encouraged to meet with one of the Coordinators of the Program during the spring semester of their first year at the College of Law. The current Coordinators are Professors Robert Denicola and Christal Sheppard. Students will normally declare their intention to participate in the Program prior to the start of their second year at the College of Law. Students are admitted to the Program upon submission of a Program Application Form approved by the Coordinators. Students may not join the Program after the drop/add date at the beginning of their third year at the College of Law.

The University of Nebraska College of Law will recognize students who complete the Program of Concentrated Study in Intellectual Property Law by making a notation of successful completion on the student’s transcript and by awarding a certificate of recognition at the time of the student’s graduation from the College of Law.


Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study

The Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study at the College of Law is designed for students who seek a litigation focus during their time at the Law College. The purpose of the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study is threefold: (1) to recommend those courses the faculty believes are important for the study and development of skills, values and doctrines necessary to be an effective and competent litigator; (2) to sequence those courses in such a way that students will gain maximum benefit from the skills, values and doctrines the courses teach; and (3) to recognize the achievements of those students completing the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study.
The faculty recognizes that, among other skills, every effective and competent litigator requires the ability to analyze and work with substantive doctrines and the ability to bring to litigation the perspectives of different schools of thought and different disciplines. Therefore, the faculty also encourages students participating in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study to take a broad sampling of doctrinal courses that emphasize different areas of law and the perspectives of different disciplines.

Students are encouraged to declare their intention to participate in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study as early as possible, so they can plan their course of studies appropriately. Students who have identified themselves as participants in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study will be given priority over non-Program students in some of the required or recommended courses. Those courses in which Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study students will receive priority are indicated in the description of the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study. The College of Law will recognize a student who successfully completes the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study by making a notation in the student's transcript and by awarding the student a certificate of recognition at the time of the student's graduation.

The Specialized Litigation Skills Courses are frequently oversubscribed and students often have difficulty in being able to take the necessary two skills courses before graduating. IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED that you begin participation in the lotteries for the skills courses as early in your law school career as possible.

The Dean's Office has designated Professors Ruser, Moberly, and Schmidt, and Dean Pierce as the Program Coordinators to administer the requirements of the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study. The responsibilities of the Program Coordinators include: (1) assisting students who seek recognition for completion of the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study in completing all Program requirements; (2) considering requests from individual students to take non-Program courses in fulfillment of Program requirements due to a required or recommended Program course being unavailable; and (3) any other responsibilities necessary to administer the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study.


Click here to declare your intention to participate in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study. Complete the information requested in the blue box. Click on the submit button. A message should appear above the blue box stating that the "Request Information has been sent."

The Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study is designed for students who seek to develop their litigation skills during their time at the College of Law. Students may choose a general litigation focus or may choose to focus on either civil or criminal litigation skills. Students may elect to have their certificate of completion of the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study indicate a civil emphasis, a criminal emphasis, or a general emphasis in litigation skills.

REQUIRED COURSES

All students in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study at the College of Law shall take and pass the following courses:

FIRST YEAR

Students must take and pass all required first-year courses in order to complete successfully the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study.

SECOND AND THIRD YEARS

General Emphasis

Students who wish to pursue a general emphasis in litigation skills shall take and pass the following courses: Civil and/or Criminal Clinic* or Immigration Clinic**, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Pretrial Litigation, and Trial Advocacy.

Civil Emphasis

Students who wish to emphasize civil litigation skills shall take and pass the following courses: Civil Clinic* or Immigration Clinic*, Evidence, Pretrial Litigation, and Trial Advocacy.

Criminal Emphasis

Students who wish to emphasize criminal litigation skills shall take and pass the following courses: Criminal Clinic*, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, and Trial Advocacy.

(*Program students have priority over non-Program students in these courses)

(**Students enrolled in Immigration Clinic cannot enroll in either Civil or Criminal Clinic.)

BLOCK REQUIREMENTS

In addition to the required courses listed above, students in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study shall take at least two courses from the following list of specialized litigation skills courses during their second and third years at the College of Law:

SPECIALIZED LITIGATION SKILLS COURSES (TWO COURSES)

  • Advanced Legal Research
  • Advanced Trial Advocacy*
  • Advocacy in Mediation
  • Appellate Advocacy*
  • Client Interviewing and Counseling
  • Construction Practice
  • Family Law Practice
  • Mediation
  • Negotiations
  • Satisfactory participation as a member of one of the following student competition teams:
  • National Trial Team, National Moot Court Team, or Regional Client Counseling Team

(*Program students have priority over non-Program students in these courses)

SEMINAR

Students in the Litigation Skills Program of Concentrated Study are encouraged to complete at least one litigation-related paper in a senior level seminar.


Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study

The Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study is designed for students who desire to practice law as a sole practitioner or in a small law firm. The Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study has four purposes:

  1. To recommend those courses the faculty believes are important for the student to be an effective and competent attorney in a solo law practice or a small law firm setting generally, while at the same time giving the student the flexibility to tailor their law school training toward particular areas of legal expertise and/or a particular geographic location.
  2. To sequence those courses in such a way that students will gain maximum benefit from the skills and doctrines the courses teach;
  3. To encourage students to begin to develop law firm management skills while in law school; and
  4. To recognize the achievements of those students completing the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study.

The faculty recognizes that effective and competent lawyers who are sole practitioners or who work in small law firms must have the ability to analyze and work with substantive legal doctrines in a variety of areas.  They may begin as general practitioners, but tend to develop a special expertise in one or two practice areas over time.  Therefore, the faculty encourages students participating in the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study to take a broad set of courses that emphasize different areas of the law, but also to study one or two areas in greater depth, and to customize their course of study in light of their future career goals.

Students are encouraged to declare their intention to participate in the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study as early as possible, so they can plan their course of studies appropriately.

The College of Law will recognize a student who successfully completes the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study by making a notation on the student's transcript and by awarding the student with a certificate of recognition at the time of the student's graduation. Completion of the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study recognizes that the student has pursued a course of study in certain basic areas that lay a foundation to practice law as a sole practitioner or in a small law firm.

The Dean's Office shall designate a Program Coordinator to administer the requirements of the Solo or Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study. The responsibilities of the Program Coordinator include:

  1. assisting students in completing all Program requirements;
  2. considering and approving requests from individual students to take non-Program courses in fulfillment of Program requirements due to a required or recommended Program course being unavailable; and
  3. carrying out any other responsibilities necessary to administer the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study.

Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study

The Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study is designed for students who desire to customize their law school training toward the future establishment of a solo or small firm practice.

Required Courses

In addition to successfully completing the usual requirements for graduation from the College of Law, all students in the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study shall successfully complete the following courses:

Law Office Management (2 credit hours)

One of the following courses (credit hours vary by clinic[1]):

  1. Civil Clinic
  2. Immigration Clinic
  3. Criminal Clinic
  4. Entrepreneurship Clinic

Four courses from the following list:

  1. Wills and Trusts (3 credit hours)
  2. Individual Income Tax (4 credit hours)
  3. Business Associations (either 3 or 4 credit hours)
  4. Criminal Procedure (3 credit hours)
  5. Family Law (3 credit hours)

Areas of Focused Study

Students in the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study shall choose at least two classes or seminars from within one of the following areas of focused study.  All of the classes listed below for areas of focused study are considered recommended courses within the Solo and Small Law Firm Program of Concentrated Study. Students should consider their own interests as well as the likely future location of their legal practice in selecting an area of focused study.

Entrepreneurship & Infrastructure Development

  1. Accounting for Lawyers
  2. Business Planning
  3. Construction Law
  4. Construction Law Practice
  5. Corporate Tax
  6. Cyberlaw
  7. Domestic Telecommunications Law
  8. Electronic Commerce
  9. Patent Law
  10. Unfair Competition

Land and Natural Resources

  1. Agricultural Environmental Law
  2. Agricultural Law
  3. Environmental Law
  4. Farm and Ranch Taxation
  5. Real Estate Transactions
  6. Water Law

Families, Health & Education

  1. Education Law
  2. Elder Law
  3. Estate Planning
  4. Family Law (if not taken as a Required Course)
  5. Family Law Practice
  6. Juvenile Law
  7. Law of Patient and Provider

Employers and Employment

  1. Employment
  2. Legal Control of Discrimination
  3. Labor Law

Government

  1. Administrative Law
  2. Land Use Planning
  3. State and Local Government
  4. Statutory Interpretation: Practice and Policy

Commercial and Banking Law

  1. Banking Law
  2. Bankruptcy Law
  3. Commercial Law: Sales
  4. Insurance Law
  5. Payment Systems
  6. Real Estate Transactions
  7. Secured Transactions
Recommended Skills Courses

Students who enter into a solo or small firm practice directly upon graduation from law school may have limited opportunities for guidance and supervision by more experienced attorneys. Therefore, students in the Solo and Small Firm Program of Concentrated Study are strongly encouraged to develop their professional skills during law school by taking courses such as Trial Advocacy, Client Interviewing & Counseling, Negotiations, Pretrial Litigation and Mediation.

[1] Program students have priority over non-Program students in these courses.

Externship Policy

With the approval of a sponsoring faculty member, students may register for up to 3 hours of Externship credit to be earned in a field placement program that meets the following conditions:

  1. The field placement program must be in conjunction with a Seminar or Research in a Selected Field and should be considered a component of such seminar or research project.
  2. An Externship proposal (see attached form) must detail 1) how the field placement will contribute to the student's educational experience, including how it relates to the associated seminar or research project, and 2) the communication plan (see #3 below) during the Externship. The Externship proposal must be approved by the sponsoring faculty member and filed with the Dean's Office.
  3. The sponsoring faculty member, the student, and any field placement supervisor must maintain regular communication by journal, electronic mail, teleconference, or scheduled meeting. A communication plan should be part of the Externship proposal.
  4. Students may register for only one Externship during their course of study at the Law College. The Externship can be from one to three credit hours. Unless a student is enrolled in a joint degree program, a student may not receive more than 12 hours of total credit from courses in Externship, Research in a Selected Field, and non-law school courses.
  5. Each Externship credit hour shall involve at least 40 hours of field experience which shall be verified by the supervising faculty member in consultation with the field placement supervisor.
  6. Credit earned in an Externship shall be awarded on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit shall be awarded by the sponsoring faculty member in consultation with the field placement supervisor. Credit in the associated Seminar or Research in a Selected Field will be on a graded basis. Credit may not be earned in Externship unless and until the associated Seminar or Research in a Selected Field is completed successfully.
  7. To the extent possible, the Externship and the associated Seminar or Research in a Selected Field should be taken contemporaneously or consecutively.
  8. A student may not receive Externship credit for participation in a field placement program for which the student receives compensation.
  9. Students may not register for Externship until they have successfully completed at least one academic year of study (33 credit hours). MLS students may not receive credit for Externship.

Proposal Form (PDF)

New Externship Policy

University of Nebraska College of Law Externship Program Policy

American Bar Association Standard 305 regarding study outside of the classroom requires that an externship program involving field placements must have a clear statement of the educational goals and methods for the externship program and a demonstrated relationship between these goals and methods to the program in operation. [1] This Externship Program Policy sets forth: (1) the criteria for awarding academic credit for externships; (2) the educational goals of the Externship Program and the methods of achieving those goals; and (3) the requirements of the Externship Program for student externs, on-side externship supervisors and faculty supervisors.

Criteria for Awarding Academic Credit

To be eligible to participate in an externship for academic credit, the student must have successfully completed the first-year law student curriculum prior to beginning participation in the externship. Under this Externship Program Policy, a maximum of three hours of externship credit shall be counted toward the graduation requirements for the J.D. degree. To have more than three credit hours for a single externship counted toward the graduation requirements for the J.D. degree, the externship must be approved by the faculty as a separate, distinct and ongoing externship program.[2] A student may participate in more than one externship during the student’s course of study at the College of Law, but the total number of credit hours awarded under this Externship Program Policy for all externships shall not exceed three credit hours.

Academic credit earned through an externship shall be awarded on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit will be determined by the faculty supervisor for the externship in consultation with the on-site externship supervisor. A student extern must complete approximately 40 hours of work to earn one hour of externship academic credit. Academic credit will be awarded once all required administrative paperwork has been completed and submitted by the faculty supervisor for the externship to the Associate Dean for Students.

A student may not receive academic credit for an externship for which the student receives compensation.  If the externship placement will be with a private sector for-profit employer, the student and the on-site externship supervisor must provide additional documentation showing how the externship will comply with the educational goals of the Externship Program and the requirements of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.[3]  Externships with private sector for-profit employers will be approved by the Associate Dean for Students and the Curriculum Committee on a case by case basis.

If the on-site externship supervisor does not have a Juris Doctorate degree, then the student and the on-site externship supervisor must provide additional documentation showing how the externship will satisfy the educational goals of the Externship Program.[4]  The Associate Dean for Students and the Curriculum Committee will approve proposed externships having a non-attorney on-site externship supervisor on a case-by-case basis.

Educational Goals

The educational goals of the Externship Program are:

  1. To encourage the further development of the student’s legal research, writing and drafting skills through work on various types of documents;
  2. To expose the student to lawyering skills through participation in or observations of activities such as interviewing, counseling, negotiation, mediation, oral and written advocacy, factual investigation, public hearings and the development of strategies for case management and the legislative process;
  3. To develop the student’s advocacy skills through participation in or observations of court proceedings, discovery, administrative agency proceedings, lobbying activities and legislative hearings and debate;
  4. To give the student practical legal experience and to enhance the student’s understanding of the application of the principles learned in law school to real world legal problems;
  5. To give the student the opportunity to participate in, and reflect upon, the work of legal institutions;
  6. To expose the student to issues of professional responsibility within the context of the workplace;
  7. To encourage the student to explore and consider the different roles that lawyers have in the economy and in society, and to expose them to the range of career opportunities available to those individuals who possess a J.D. degree; and
  8. To permit the student to gain practical experience in specialized areas of the law through experiences that will supplement the student’s course work within the law school.

Methods and Program Requirements

The following methods will be used to achieve the educational goals of the Externship Program:

  1. Student Externs

    Student externs must meet all of the requirements below for the externship in order to receive academic credit.

    1. Externship Proposal Application. The Externship Proposal Application (Appendix A) must be completed and approved by the Associate Dean for Students prior to the starting date of the externship.

    2. Externship Educational Planning Form. The Externship Educational Planning Form (Appendix C) must be completed and returned to the faculty supervisor within one week of the starting date for the externship.

    3. Daily Log (Timesheets). The student extern must complete a daily log describing the student’s externship work activities and the time spent on those activities. A sample log/timesheet form is attached as Appendix D. All daily logs must be signed by the on-site externship supervisor and provided by the student on a regular basis to the faculty supervisor.

    4. Evaluations. An evaluation of the student extern (Appendix E) must be completed by the on-site externship supervisor after the first six weeks of the externship and at the conclusion of the externship. Evaluations must be returned to the faculty supervisor. It is the student extern’s responsibility to make sure that all required evaluations are completed and returned to the faculty supervisor in a timely manner. No academic credit will be awarded for the externship until all evaluations have been turned in to the faculty supervisor.

      In order to provide for meaningful periodic review of the externship and to facilitate the training of externship supervisors, the student extern must complete an evaluation of the on-site externship supervisor and the overall quality of the externship placement (Appendix E) at the conclusion of the externship. This evaluation must be turned in to the faculty supervisor for the externship.


    5. Writing Samples. If permitted by the on-site externship supervisor, the student will submit to the faculty supervisor two samples of written work done during the externship. Writing samples may be any type of writing that is representative of the student’s activities during the externship. The student extern is responsible for redacting the writing samples to maintain confidentiality in accordance with the standards established by the externship placement.[5]

    6. Reflective Journal Writings and Optional Outside Reading and Writing Assignments. The student extern must prepare weekly journal entries during the course of the externship. The purpose of these journal entries is to reflect on the externship experience. In addition, the faculty supervisor has discretion to assign additional outside readings that are relevant to the externship and may require the student to write several short reflective papers or one longer paper. Journal entries must be provided to the faculty supervisor at regular intervals. In preparing the journal entries and any other reflective papers, the student extern is responsible for maintaining confidentiality in accordance with the standards of the externship placement. Faculty supervisors are encouraged to provide a list of representative journal entry topics to assist the student in preparing thoughtful journal entries.

  2. On-Site Externship Supervisors

    The role of the on-site externship supervisor is central to the student’s educational experience. On-site externship supervisors are expected to perform the following tasks:

    1. On-Site Externship Supervisor Agreement. The On-Site Externship Supervisor Agreement (Appendix B) must be signed and returned as part of the student’s Externship Proposal Application prior to the starting date of the externship.

    2. Externship Educational Planning Form. The Externship Educational Planning Form (Appendix C) must be completed with the student extern at the commencement of the externship and returned to the faculty supervisor no later than one week after the starting date of the externship.

    3. Evaluations. The on-site externship supervisor must evaluate the student extern (Appendix E) after the student has completed six weeks of the externship and again at the conclusion of the externship.

    4. Work Assignments and Ongoing Assessment/Feedback.
      The on-site externship supervisor is responsible for providing assignments to the student that are consistent with the educational goals and methods set forth in the Externship Program Policy and the student’s individualized Externship Educational Planning Form. The on-site externship supervisor is expected to provide assessment and feedback to the student extern concerning the work assignments on a regular basis. Suggestions for assessment and feedback are contained in the Guidelines for On-Site Externship Supervisors (Appendix F).

  3. Faculty Supervisors

    The role of the faculty supervisor is to monitor the student’s externship experience for compliance with the educational goals of the externship. The faculty supervisor is to assist the student in reflecting upon the relationship between the principles learned in law school and the resolution of real world legal problems, the role of lawyers and legal institutions in society, and the fundamental values and professional responsibilities of practicing lawyers. Faculty supervisors are expected to perform the following tasks:

    1. Monitoring. The faculty supervisor should review and monitor the student extern’s educational experience using the daily log of activities, the weekly journal entries, and any other writings assigned at the discretion of the faculty supervisor.

    2. Regular Communication. The faculty supervisor should communicate on a regular basis with the student extern and, if necessary, assist the student in addressing any issues that are raised by the six week evaluation or any other on-site work place issues that may arise.

    3. Educational Enhancement. Where appropriate, the faculty supervisor has discretion to assign additional outside reading material and/or additional writing assignments that are designed to enhance the student’s educational experience.



[1] American Bar Association Standard 305 is attached as Appendix G.

[2] See, e.g., the College of Law’s D.C. Government Agency and Institution Semester Externship.

[3] See Appendix A, Externship Proposal Application, Appendix B, On-Site Externship Supervisor Agreement, and Appendix H, Requirements for Externships with Private Sector For-Profit Employers Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

[4] See Appendix A, Externship Proposal Application, and Appendix B, On-Site Externship Supervisor Agreement.

[5] The Guidelines for On-Site Externship Supervisors (Appendix F) require the supervisor to brief the student on the confidentiality requirements of the externship placement as part the process for completing the Externship Educational Form (Appendix C) with the student extern at the commencement of the externship.

Externship Appendices

Pro Bono Initiative

The Pro Bono Initiative seeks to encourage and recognize volunteer legal service by College of Law students during their second and third years at the College.

To be recognized under the pro bono initiative, pro bono work must be:

  1. Uncompensated - students may not receive either money or academic credit.
  2. Law-related - the work must involve the application, interpretation, instruction, or other use of the law under the guidance of a supervising attorney.
  3. In the public interest - including, among other things, service to the indigent, efforts to protect essential rights and liberties, law reform projects, and projects to improve the legal profession or the public's understanding of the law.

In addition to these requirements, pro bono work must be approved by the Dean's office prior to completion to qualify for this initiative. A student seeking recognition under the Pro Bono Initiative must complete the attached Pro Bono Certification Form and submit it to the Dean's Office. A separate form must be used for each pro bono project completed by the student.

  1. Students completing 50 hours or more of qualified pro bono work during their 2nd and/or 3rd year at the College will receive a Dean's certificate upon graduation.
  2. Each year at least one student may be recognized for outstanding pro bono service.

Certification Form (PDF)

Study Abroad Programs

Cambridge Bridge

The College of Law is affiliated with a summer foreign study program at Downing College, Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. This exciting opportunity allows students to obtain new and interesting perspectives on the law as well as enjoy new experiences in one of the most important and beautiful academic institutions in the world. Students who have completed the first year of law school and are currently in good standing are eligible for admission to the Cambridge Study Abroad Program. Students may take up to 6 credit hours or three 2 credit hour classes. The Cambridge Study Abroad Program is a fully ABA-accredited program jointly sponsored by Downing College of Cambridge University and the University of Mississippi School of Law, in affiliation with the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville School of Law, The University of Tennessee College of Law and the University of Nebraska College of Law.
Click here for more information.

Students may pursue other study abroad programs at ABA-approved law schools as visiting students.

 

Not all courses are offered each year. With our students’ benefit in mind, the faculty constantly reviews the curriculum to reflect changes in the law as well as in the interests and expertise of the faculty. So, some classes are not offered every year, and we often add new courses to the curriculum. We try our best to keep these pages updated with those new changes.

Finally, please know that our courses are open only to (a) students enrolled in the College or (b) graduate or professional students who have received the approval of their faculty advisor, the faculty member teaching the course and the Dean of the College. Several courses are cross-listed with graduate departments throughout the University and are open to graduate or professional students in other colleges subject to appropriate approval. Cross-listed courses are identified by the presence of a 'G' following the law course number. The most recent list of cross-listed courses is available from the College of Law.